Speeches (Lines) for Antonio
in "Merchant of Venice"

Total: 47

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,2

In sooth, I know not why I am so sad:
It wearies me; you say it wearies you;...

2

I,1,43

Believe me, no: I thank my fortune for it,
My ventures are not in one bottom trusted,...

3

I,1,49

Fie, fie!

4

I,1,66

Your worth is very dear in my regard.
I take it, your own business calls on you...

5

I,1,82

I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano;
A stage where every man must play a part,...

6

I,1,116

Farewell: I'll grow a talker for this gear.

7

I,1,120

Is that any thing now?

8

I,1,126

Well, tell me now what lady is the same
To whom you swore a secret pilgrimage,...

9

I,1,142

I pray you, good Bassanio, let me know it;
And if it stand, as you yourself still do,...

10

I,1,160

You know me well, and herein spend but time
To wind about my love with circumstance;...

11

I,1,184

Thou know'st that all my fortunes are at sea;
Neither have I money nor commodity...

12

I,3,385

Shylock, although I neither lend nor borrow
By taking nor by giving of excess,...

13

I,3,391

And for three months.

14

I,3,396

I do never use it.

15

I,3,401

And what of him? did he take interest?

16

I,3,417

This was a venture, sir, that Jacob served for;
A thing not in his power to bring to pass,...

17

I,3,424

Mark you this, Bassanio,
The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose....

18

I,3,432

Well, Shylock, shall we be beholding to you?

19

I,3,456

I am as like to call thee so again,
To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too....

20

I,3,480

Content, i' faith: I'll seal to such a bond
And say there is much kindness in the Jew.

21

I,3,484

Why, fear not, man; I will not forfeit it:
Within these two months, that's a month before...

22

I,3,499

Yes Shylock, I will seal unto this bond.

23

I,3,506

Hie thee, gentle Jew.
[Exit Shylock]...

24

I,3,510

Come on: in this there can be no dismay;
My ships come home a month before the day.

25

II,6,976

Who's there?

26

II,6,978

Fie, fie, Gratiano! where are all the rest?
'Tis nine o'clock: our friends all stay for you....

27

III,3,1711

Hear me yet, good Shylock.

28

III,3,1719

I pray thee, hear me speak.

29

III,3,1729

Let him alone:
I'll follow him no more with bootless prayers....

30

III,3,1737

The duke cannot deny the course of law:
For the commodity that strangers have...

31

IV,1,1932

Ready, so please your grace.

32

IV,1,1937

I have heard
Your grace hath ta'en great pains to qualify...

33

IV,1,2002

I pray you, think you question with the Jew:
You may as well go stand upon the beach...

34

IV,1,2047

I am a tainted wether of the flock,
Meetest for death: the weakest kind of fruit...

35

IV,1,2120

Ay, so he says.

36

IV,1,2122

I do.

37

IV,1,2185

Most heartily I do beseech the court
To give the judgment.

38

IV,1,2209

But little: I am arm'd and well prepared.
Give me your hand, Bassanio: fare you well!...

39

IV,1,2329

So please my lord the duke and all the court
To quit the fine for one half of his goods,...

40

IV,1,2366

And stand indebted, over and above,
In love and service to you evermore.

41

IV,1,2405

My Lord Bassanio, let him have the ring:
Let his deservings and my love withal...

42

V,1,2603

No more than I am well acquitted of.

43

V,1,2706

I am the unhappy subject of these quarrels.

44

V,1,2719

I once did lend my body for his wealth;
Which, but for him that had your husband's ring,...

45

V,1,2726

Here, Lord Bassanio; swear to keep this ring.

46

V,1,2750

I am dumb.

47

V,1,2757

Sweet lady, you have given me life and living;
For here I read for certain that my ships...

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