Speeches (Lines) for Alonso
in "Tempest"

Total: 40

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,15

Good boatswain, have care. Where's the master?
Play the men.

2

II,1,715

Prithee, peace.

3

II,1,730

I prithee, spare.

4

II,1,806

You cram these words into mine ears against
The stomach of my sense. Would I had never
Married my daughter there! for, coming thence,
My son is lost and, in my rate, she too,
Who is so far from Italy removed
I ne'er again shall see her. O thou mine heir
Of Naples and of Milan, what strange fish
Hath made his meal on thee?

5

II,1,824

No, no, he's gone.

6

II,1,830

Prithee, peace.

7

II,1,840

So is the dear'st o' the loss.

8

II,1,882

Prithee, no more: thou dost talk nothing to me.

9

II,1,904

What, all so soon asleep! I wish mine eyes
Would, with themselves, shut up my thoughts: I find
They are inclined to do so.

10

II,1,914

Thank you. Wondrous heavy.

11

II,1,1054

Why, how now? ho, awake! Why are you drawn?
Wherefore this ghastly looking?

12

II,1,1061

I heard nothing.

13

II,1,1065

Heard you this, Gonzalo?

14

II,1,1072

Lead off this ground; and let's make further search
For my poor son.

15

II,1,1076

Lead away.

16

III,3,1558

Old lord, I cannot blame thee,
Who am myself attach'd with weariness,
To the dulling of my spirits: sit down, and rest.
Even here I will put off my hope and keep it
No longer for my flatterer: he is drown'd
Whom thus we stray to find, and the sea mocks
Our frustrate search on land. Well, let him go.

17

III,3,1577

What harmony is this? My good friends, hark!

18

III,3,1584

Give us kind keepers, heavens! What were these?

19

III,3,1605

I cannot too much muse
Such shapes, such gesture and such sound, expressing,
Although they want the use of tongue, a kind
Of excellent dumb discourse.

20

III,3,1614

Not I.

21

III,3,1622

I will stand to and feed,
Although my last: no matter, since I feel
The best is past. Brother, my lord the duke,
Stand to and do as we.
[Thunder and lightning. Enter ARIEL, like a]
harpy; claps his wings upon the table; and,
with a quaint device, the banquet vanishes]

22

III,3,1678

O, it is monstrous, monstrous:
Methought the billows spoke and told me of it;
The winds did sing it to me, and the thunder,
That deep and dreadful organ-pipe, pronounced
The name of Prosper: it did bass my trespass.
Therefore my son i' the ooze is bedded, and
I'll seek him deeper than e'er plummet sounded
And with him there lie mudded.

23

V,1,2144

Whether thou best he or no,
Or some enchanted trifle to abuse me,
As late I have been, I not know: thy pulse
Beats as of flesh and blood; and, since I saw thee,
The affliction of my mind amends, with which,
I fear, a madness held me: this must crave,
An if this be at all, a most strange story.
Thy dukedom I resign and do entreat
Thou pardon me my wrongs. But how should Prospero
Be living and be here?

24

V,1,2174

If thou be'st Prospero,
Give us particulars of thy preservation;
How thou hast met us here, who three hours since
Were wreck'd upon this shore; where I have lost—
How sharp the point of this remembrance is!—
My dear son Ferdinand.

25

V,1,2181

Irreparable is the loss, and patience
Says it is past her cure.

26

V,1,2187

You the like loss!

27

V,1,2192

A daughter?
O heavens, that they were living both in Naples,
The king and queen there! that they were, I wish
Myself were mudded in that oozy bed
Where my son lies. When did you lose your daughter?

28

V,1,2223

If this prove
A vision of the Island, one dear son
Shall I twice lose.

29

V,1,2230

Now all the blessings
Of a glad father compass thee about!
Arise, and say how thou camest here.

30

V,1,2238

What is this maid with whom thou wast at play?
Your eld'st acquaintance cannot be three hours:
Is she the goddess that hath sever'd us,
And brought us thus together?

31

V,1,2251

I am hers:
But, O, how oddly will it sound that I
Must ask my child forgiveness!

32

V,1,2262

I say, Amen, Gonzalo!

33

V,1,2272

[To FERDINAND and MIRANDA] Give me your hands:
Let grief and sorrow still embrace his heart
That doth not wish you joy!

34

V,1,2291

These are not natural events; they strengthen
From strange to stranger. Say, how came you hither?

35

V,1,2307

This is as strange a maze as e'er men trod
And there is in this business more than nature
Was ever conduct of: some oracle
Must rectify our knowledge.

36

V,1,2352

Is not this Stephano, my drunken butler?

37

V,1,2354

And Trinculo is reeling ripe: where should they
Find this grand liquor that hath gilded 'em?
How camest thou in this pickle?

38

V,1,2364

This is a strange thing as e'er I look'd on.

39

V,1,2375

Hence, and bestow your luggage where you found it.

40

V,1,2390

I long
To hear the story of your life, which must
Take the ear strangely.

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