Speeches (Lines) for Alcibiades
in "Timon of Athens"

Total: 39

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,295

Sir, you have saved my longing, and I feed
Most hungerly on your sight.

2

I,2,415

My heart is ever at your service, my lord.

3

I,2,418

So the were bleeding-new, my lord, there's no meat
like 'em: I could wish my best friend at such a feast.

4

I,2,592

Ay, defiled land, my lord.

5

III,5,1312

Honour, health, and compassion to the senate!

6

III,5,1314

I am an humble suitor to your virtues;
For pity is the virtue of the law,...

7

III,5,1346

My lord,—

8

III,5,1349

My lords, then, under favour, pardon me,
If I speak like a captain....

9

III,5,1369

In vain! his service done
At Lacedaemon and Byzantium...

10

III,5,1373

I say, my lords, he has done fair service,
And slain in fight many of your enemies:...

11

III,5,1386

Hard fate! he might have died in war.
My lords, if not for any parts in him—...

12

III,5,1400

Must it be so? it must not be. My lords,
I do beseech you, know me.

13

III,5,1403

Call me to your remembrances.

14

III,5,1405

I cannot think but your age has forgot me;
It could not else be, I should prove so base,...

15

III,5,1412

Banish me!
Banish your dotage; banish usury,...

16

III,5,1420

Now the gods keep you old enough; that you may live
Only in bone, that none may look on you!...

17

IV,3,1717

What art thou there? speak.

18

IV,3,1720

What is thy name? Is man so hateful to thee,
That art thyself a man?

19

IV,3,1725

I know thee well;
But in thy fortunes am unlearn'd and strange.

20

IV,3,1737

How came the noble Timon to this change?

21

IV,3,1741

Noble Timon,
What friendship may I do thee?

22

IV,3,1745

What is it, Timon?

23

IV,3,1750

I have heard in some sort of thy miseries.

24

IV,3,1752

I see them now; then was a blessed time.

25

IV,3,1764

Pardon him, sweet Timandra; for his wits
Are drown'd and lost in his calamities....

26

IV,3,1773

I am thy friend, and pity thee, dear Timon.

27

IV,3,1776

Why, fare thee well:
Here is some gold for thee.

28

IV,3,1779

When I have laid proud Athens on a heap,—

29

IV,3,1781

Ay, Timon, and have cause.

30

IV,3,1784

Why me, Timon?

31

IV,3,1809

Hast thou gold yet? I'll take the gold thou
givest me,...

32

IV,3,1851

Strike up the drum towards Athens! Farewell, Timon:
If I thrive well, I'll visit thee again.

33

IV,3,1854

I never did thee harm.

34

IV,3,1856

Call'st thou that harm?

35

IV,3,1859

We but offend him. Strike!
[Drum beats. Exeunt ALCIBIADES, PHRYNIA,]...

36

V,4,2556

Sound to this coward and lascivious town
Our terrible approach....

37

V,4,2621

Then there's my glove;
Descend, and open your uncharged ports:...

38

V,4,2632

Descend, and keep your words.

39

V,4,2640

[Reads the epitaph] 'Here lies a
wretched corse, of wretched soul bereft:...

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