Speeches (Lines) for Agamemnon
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 52

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,451

Princes,
What grief hath set the jaundice on your cheeks?...

2

I,3,523

Speak, prince of Ithaca; and be't of less expect
That matter needless, of importless burden,...

3

I,3,593

The nature of the sickness found, Ulysses,
What is the remedy?

4

I,3,667

What trumpet? look, Menelaus.

5

I,3,670

What would you 'fore our tent?

6

I,3,672

Even this.

7

I,3,675

With surety stronger than Achilles' arm
'Fore all the Greekish heads, which with one voice...

8

I,3,681

How!

9

I,3,689

This Trojan scorns us; or the men of Troy
Are ceremonious courtiers.

10

I,3,703

Sir, you of Troy, call you yourself AEneas?

11

I,3,705

What's your affair I pray you?

12

I,3,707

He hears naught privately that comes from Troy.

13

I,3,712

Speak frankly as the wind;
It is not Agamemnon's sleeping hour:...

14

I,3,745

This shall be told our lovers, Lord AEneas;
If none of them have soul in such a kind,...

15

I,3,765

Fair Lord AEneas, let me touch your hand;
To our pavilion shall I lead you, sir....

16

II,3,1291

Where is Achilles?

17

II,3,1293

Let it be known to him that we are here.
He shent our messengers; and we lay by...

18

II,3,1330

Hear you, Patroclus:
We are too well acquainted with these answers:...

19

II,3,1360

In second voice we'll not be satisfied;
We come to speak with him. Ulysses, enter you.

20

II,3,1364

No more than what he thinks he is.

21

II,3,1367

No question.

22

II,3,1369

No, noble Ajax; you are as strong, as valiant, as
wise, no less noble, much more gentle, and altogether...

23

II,3,1374

Your mind is the clearer, Ajax, and your virtues the
fairer. He that is proud eats up himself: pride is...

24

II,3,1384

What's his excuse?

25

II,3,1389

Why will he not upon our fair request
Untent his person and share the air with us?

26

II,3,1427

O, no, you shall not go.

27

II,3,1436

He will be the physician that should be the patient.

28

II,3,1489

Go we to council. Let Achilles sleep:
Light boats sail swift, though greater hulks draw deep.

29

III,3,1882

What wouldst thou of us, Trojan? make demand.

30

III,3,1896

Let Diomedes bear him,
And bring us Cressid hither: Calchas shall have...

31

III,3,1918

We'll execute your purpose, and put on
A form of strangeness as we pass along:...

32

III,3,1925

What says Achilles? would he aught with us?

33

III,3,1929

The better.

34

IV,5,2595

Here art thou in appointment fresh and fair,
Anticipating time with starting courage....

35

IV,5,2610

Is not yond Diomed, with Calchas' daughter?

36

IV,5,2615

Is this the Lady Cressid?

37

IV,5,2617

Most dearly welcome to the Greeks, sweet lady.

38

IV,5,2672

Yonder comes the troop.
[Enter HECTOR, armed; AENEAS, TROILUS, and other]...

39

IV,5,2682

Which way would Hector have it?

40

IV,5,2702

Here is Sir Diomed. Go, gentle knight,
Stand by our Ajax: as you and Lord AEneas...

41

IV,5,2710

What Trojan is that same that looks so heavy?

42

IV,5,2729

They are in action.

43

IV,5,2733

His blows are well disposed: there, Ajax!

44

IV,5,2785

Worthy of arms! as welcome as to one
That would be rid of such an enemy;...

45

IV,5,2795

[To TROILUS] My well-famed lord of Troy, no
less to you.

46

IV,5,2903

First, all you peers of Greece, go to my tent;
There in the full convive we: afterwards,...

47

V,1,3001

We go wrong, we go wrong.

48

V,1,3009

So now, fair prince of Troy, I bid good night.
Ajax commands the guard to tend on you.

49

V,1,3018

Good night.

50

V,5,3461

Renew, renew! The fierce Polydamas
Hath beat down Menon: bastard Margarelon...

51

V,9,3619

Hark! hark! what shout is that?

52

V,9,3626

March patiently along: let one be sent
To pray Achilles see us at our tent....

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