Speeches (Lines) for Aaron
in "Titus Andronicus"

Total: 57

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,548

Now climbeth Tamora Olympus' top,
Safe out of fortune's shot; and sits aloft,...

2

II,1,585

[Aside] Clubs, clubs! these lovers will not keep
the peace.

3

II,1,596

[Coming forward] Why, how now, lords!
So near the emperor's palace dare you draw,...

4

II,1,612

Away, I say!
Now, by the gods that warlike Goths adore,...

5

II,1,627

Why, are ye mad? or know ye not, in Rome
How furious and impatient they be,...

6

II,1,634

To achieve her! how?

7

II,1,644

[Aside] Ay, and as good as Saturninus may.

8

II,1,649

Why, then, it seems, some certain snatch or so
Would serve your turns.

9

II,1,653

Would you had hit it too!
Then should not we be tired with this ado....

10

II,1,660

For shame, be friends, and join for that you jar:
'Tis policy and stratagem must do...

11

II,3,732

He that had wit would think that I had none,
To bury so much gold under a tree,...

12

II,3,763

Madam, though Venus govern your desires,
Saturn is dominator over mine:...

13

II,3,785

No more, great empress; Bassianus comes:
Be cross with him; and I'll go fetch thy sons...

14

II,3,937

Come on, my lords, the better foot before:
Straight will I bring you to the loathsome pit...

15

II,3,952

[Aside] Now will I fetch the king to find them here,
That he thereby may give a likely guess...

16

II,3,1032

My gracious lord, here is the bag of gold.

17

III,1,1281

Titus Andronicus, my lord the emperor
Sends thee this word,—that, if thou love thy sons,...

18

III,1,1305

Nay, come, agree whose hand shall go along,
For fear they die before their pardon come.

19

III,1,1321

[Aside] If that be call'd deceit, I will be honest,
And never, whilst I live, deceive men so:...

20

III,1,1335

I go, Andronicus: and for thy hand
Look by and by to have thy sons with thee....

21

IV,2,1682

Ay, some mad message from his mad grandfather.

22

IV,2,1708

Ay, just; a verse in Horace; right, you have it.
[Aside]...

23

IV,2,1724

Had he not reason, Lord Demetrius?
Did you not use his daughter very friendly?

24

IV,2,1729

Here lacks but your mother for to say amen.

25

IV,2,1733

[Aside] Pray to the devils; the gods have given us over.

26

IV,2,1741

Well, more or less, or ne'er a whit at all,
Here Aaron is; and what with Aaron now?

27

IV,2,1745

Why, what a caterwauling dost thou keep!
What dost thou wrap and fumble in thine arms?

28

IV,2,1750

To whom?

29

IV,2,1752

Well, God give her good rest! What hath he sent her?

30

IV,2,1754

Why, then she is the devil's dam; a joyful issue.

31

IV,2,1760

'Zounds, ye whore! is black so base a hue?
Sweet blowse, you are a beauteous blossom, sure.

32

IV,2,1763

That which thou canst not undo.

33

IV,2,1765

Villain, I have done thy mother.

34

IV,2,1770

It shall not die.

35

IV,2,1772

What, must it, nurse? then let no man but I
Do execution on my flesh and blood.

36

IV,2,1776

Sooner this sword shall plough thy bowels up.
[Takes the Child from the Nurse, and draws]...

37

IV,2,1797

My mistress is my mistress; this myself,
The vigour and the picture of my youth:...

38

IV,2,1806

Why, there's the privilege your beauty bears:
Fie, treacherous hue, that will betray with blushing...

39

IV,2,1822

Then sit we down, and let us all consult.
My son and I will have the wind of you:...

40

IV,2,1827

Why, so, brave lords! when we join in league,
I am a lamb: but if you brave the Moor,...

41

IV,2,1834

The empress, the midwife, and yourself:
Two may keep counsel when the third's away:...

42

IV,2,1840

O Lord, sir, 'tis a deed of policy:
Shall she live to betray this guilt of ours,...

43

IV,2,1868

Now to the Goths, as swift as swallow flies;
There to dispose this treasure in mine arms,...

44

V,1,2182

Touch not the boy; he is of royal blood.

45

V,1,2188

Lucius, save the child,
And bear it from me to the empress....

46

V,1,2196

An if it please thee! why, assure thee, Lucius,
'Twill vex thy soul to hear what I shall speak;...

47

V,1,2205

Swear that he shall, and then I will begin.

48

V,1,2208

What if I do not? as, indeed, I do not;
Yet, for I know thou art religious...

49

V,1,2222

First know thou, I begot him on the empress.

50

V,1,2224

Tut, Lucius, this was but a deed of charity
To that which thou shalt hear of me anon....

51

V,1,2230

Why, she was wash'd and cut and trimm'd, and 'twas
Trim sport for them that had the doing of it.

52

V,1,2233

Indeed, I was their tutor to instruct them:
That codding spirit had they from their mother,...

53

V,1,2257

Ay, like a black dog, as the saying is.

54

V,1,2259

Ay, that I had not done a thousand more.
Even now I curse the day—and yet, I think,...

55

V,1,2282

If there be devils, would I were a devil,
To live and burn in everlasting fire,...

56

V,3,2536

Some devil whisper curses in mine ear,
And prompt me, that my tongue may utter forth...

57

V,3,2729

O, why should wrath be mute, and fury dumb?
I am no baby, I, that with base prayers...

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