Speeches (Lines) for Antipholus of Syracuse
in "Comedy of Errors"

Total: 103

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# Act, Scene, Line
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Speech text

1

I,2,171

Go bear it to the Centaur, where we host,
And stay there, Dromio, till I come to thee.
Within this hour it will be dinner-time:
Till that, I'll view the manners of the town,
Peruse the traders, gaze upon the buildings,
And then return and sleep within mine inn,
For with long travel I am stiff and weary.
Get thee away.

2

I,2,182

A trusty villain, sir, that very oft,
When I am dull with care and melancholy,
Lightens my humour with his merry jests.
What, will you walk with me about the town,
And then go to my inn and dine with me?

3

I,2,193

Farewell till then: I will go lose myself
And wander up and down to view the city.

4

I,2,197

He that commends me to mine own content
Commends me to the thing I cannot get.
I to the world am like a drop of water
That in the ocean seeks another drop,
Who, falling there to find his fellow forth,
Unseen, inquisitive, confounds himself:
So I, to find a mother and a brother,
In quest of them, unhappy, lose myself.
[Enter DROMIO of Ephesus]
Here comes the almanac of my true date.
What now? how chance thou art return'd so soon?

5

I,2,218

Stop in your wind, sir: tell me this, I pray:
Where have you left the money that I gave you?

6

I,2,223

I am not in a sportive humour now:
Tell me, and dally not, where is the money?
We being strangers here, how darest thou trust
So great a charge from thine own custody?

7

I,2,233

Come, Dromio, come, these jests are out of season;
Reserve them till a merrier hour than this.
Where is the gold I gave in charge to thee?

8

I,2,237

Come on, sir knave, have done your foolishness,
And tell me how thou hast disposed thy charge.

9

I,2,242

In what safe place you have bestow'd my money,
Or I shall break that merry sconce of yours
That stands on tricks when I am undisposed:
Where is the thousand marks thou hadst of me?

10

I,2,251

Thy mistress' marks? what mistress, slave, hast thou?

11

I,2,255

What, wilt thou flout me thus unto my face,
Being forbid? There, take you that, sir knave.

12

I,2,260

Upon my life, by some device or other
The villain is o'er-raught of all my money.
They say this town is full of cozenage,
As, nimble jugglers that deceive the eye,
Dark-working sorcerers that change the mind,
Soul-killing witches that deform the body,
Disguised cheaters, prating mountebanks,
And many such-like liberties of sin:
If it prove so, I will be gone the sooner.
I'll to the Centaur, to go seek this slave:
I greatly fear my money is not safe.

13

II,2,393

The gold I gave to Dromio is laid up
Safe at the Centaur; and the heedful slave
Is wander'd forth, in care to seek me out
By computation and mine host's report.
I could not speak with Dromio since at first
I sent him from the mart. See, here he comes.
[Enter DROMIO of Syracuse]
How now sir! is your merry humour alter'd?
As you love strokes, so jest with me again.
You know no Centaur? you received no gold?
Your mistress sent to have me home to dinner?
My house was at the Phoenix? Wast thou mad,
That thus so madly thou didst answer me?

14

II,2,407

Even now, even here, not half an hour since.

15

II,2,410

Villain, thou didst deny the gold's receipt,
And told'st me of a mistress and a dinner;
For which, I hope, thou felt'st I was displeased.

16

II,2,415

Yea, dost thou jeer and flout me in the teeth?
Think'st thou I jest? Hold, take thou that, and that.

17

II,2,420

Because that I familiarly sometimes
Do use you for my fool and chat with you,
Your sauciness will jest upon my love
And make a common of my serious hours.
When the sun shines let foolish gnats make sport,
But creep in crannies when he hides his beams.
If you will jest with me, know my aspect,
And fashion your demeanor to my looks,
Or I will beat this method in your sconce.

18

II,2,434

Dost thou not know?

19

II,2,436

Shall I tell you why?

20

II,2,439

Why, first,—for flouting me; and then, wherefore—
For urging it the second time to me.

21

II,2,445

Thank me, sir, for what?

22

II,2,447

I'll make you amends next, to give you nothing for
something. But say, sir, is it dinner-time?

23

II,2,450

In good time, sir; what's that?

24

II,2,452

Well, sir, then 'twill be dry.

25

II,2,454

Your reason?

26

II,2,457

Well, sir, learn to jest in good time: there's a
time for all things.

27

II,2,460

By what rule, sir?

28

II,2,463

Let's hear it.

29

II,2,466

May he not do it by fine and recovery?

30

II,2,469

Why is Time such a niggard of hair, being, as it is,
so plentiful an excrement?

31

II,2,473

Why, but there's many a man hath more hair than wit.

32

II,2,475

Why, thou didst conclude hairy men plain dealers without wit.

33

II,2,478

For what reason?

34

II,2,480

Nay, not sound, I pray you.

35

II,2,482

Nay, not sure, in a thing falsing.

36

II,2,484

Name them.

37

II,2,488

You would all this time have proved there is no
time for all things.

38

II,2,492

But your reason was not substantial, why there is no
time to recover.

39

II,2,496

I knew 'twould be a bald conclusion:
But, soft! who wafts us yonder?

40

II,2,536

Plead you to me, fair dame? I know you not:
In Ephesus I am but two hours old,
As strange unto your town as to your talk;
Who, every word by all my wit being scann'd,
Want wit in all one word to understand.

41

II,2,544

By Dromio?

42

II,2,549

Did you converse, sir, with this gentlewoman?
What is the course and drift of your compact?

43

II,2,552

Villain, thou liest; for even her very words
Didst thou deliver to me on the mart.

44

II,2,555

How can she thus then call us by our names,
Unless it be by inspiration.

45

II,2,570

To me she speaks; she moves me for her theme:
What, was I married to her in my dream?
Or sleep I now and think I hear all this?
What error drives our eyes and ears amiss?
Until I know this sure uncertainty,
I'll entertain the offer'd fallacy.

46

II,2,585

I think thou art in mind, and so am I.

47

II,2,587

Thou hast thine own form.

48

II,2,602

Am I in earth, in heaven, or in hell?
Sleeping or waking? mad or well-advised?
Known unto these, and to myself disguised!
I'll say as they say and persever so,
And in this mist at all adventures go.

49

III,2,791

Sweet mistress—what your name is else, I know not,
Nor by what wonder you do hit of mine,—
Less in your knowledge and your grace you show not
Than our earth's wonder, more than earth divine.
Teach me, dear creature, how to think and speak;
Lay open to my earthy-gross conceit,
Smother'd in errors, feeble, shallow, weak,
The folded meaning of your words' deceit.
Against my soul's pure truth why labour you
To make it wander in an unknown field?
Are you a god? would you create me new?
Transform me then, and to your power I'll yield.
But if that I am I, then well I know
Your weeping sister is no wife of mine,
Nor to her bed no homage do I owe
Far more, far more to you do I decline.
O, train me not, sweet mermaid, with thy note,
To drown me in thy sister's flood of tears:
Sing, siren, for thyself and I will dote:
Spread o'er the silver waves thy golden hairs,
And as a bed I'll take them and there lie,
And in that glorious supposition think
He gains by death that hath such means to die:
Let Love, being light, be drowned if she sink!

50

III,2,816

Not mad, but mated; how, I do not know.

51

III,2,818

For gazing on your beams, fair sun, being by.

52

III,2,820

As good to wink, sweet love, as look on night.

53

III,2,822

Thy sister's sister.

54

III,2,824

No;
It is thyself, mine own self's better part,
Mine eye's clear eye, my dear heart's dearer heart,
My food, my fortune and my sweet hope's aim,
My sole earth's heaven and my heaven's claim.

55

III,2,830

Call thyself sister, sweet, for I am thee.
Thee will I love and with thee lead my life:
Thou hast no husband yet nor I no wife.
Give me thy hand.

56

III,2,838

Why, how now, Dromio! where runn'st thou so fast?

57

III,2,841

Thou art Dromio, thou art my man, thou art thyself.

58

III,2,843

What woman's man? and how besides thyself? besides thyself?

59

III,2,846

What claim lays she to thee?

60

III,2,851

What is she?

61

III,2,856

How dost thou mean a fat marriage?

62

III,2,863

What complexion is she of?

63

III,2,867

That's a fault that water will mend.

64

III,2,869

What's her name?

65

III,2,873

Then she bears some breadth?

66

III,2,877

In what part of her body stands Ireland?

67

III,2,879

Where Scotland?

68

III,2,881

Where France?

69

III,2,884

Where England?

70

III,2,888

Where Spain?

71

III,2,890

Where America, the Indies?

72

III,2,895

Where stood Belgia, the Netherlands?

73

III,2,906

Go hie thee presently, post to the road:
An if the wind blow any way from shore,
I will not harbour in this town to-night:
If any bark put forth, come to the mart,
Where I will walk till thou return to me.
If every one knows us and we know none,
'Tis time, I think, to trudge, pack and be gone.

74

III,2,916

There's none but witches do inhabit here;
And therefore 'tis high time that I were hence.
She that doth call me husband, even my soul
Doth for a wife abhor. But her fair sister,
Possess'd with such a gentle sovereign grace,
Of such enchanting presence and discourse,
Hath almost made me traitor to myself:
But, lest myself be guilty to self-wrong,
I'll stop mine ears against the mermaid's song.

75

III,2,927

Ay, that's my name.

76

III,2,931

What is your will that I shall do with this?

77

III,2,933

Made it for me, sir! I bespoke it not.

78

III,2,938

I pray you, sir, receive the money now,
For fear you ne'er see chain nor money more.

79

III,2,942

What I should think of this, I cannot tell:
But this I think, there's no man is so vain
That would refuse so fair an offer'd chain.
I see a man here needs not live by shifts,
When in the streets he meets such golden gifts.
I'll to the mart, and there for Dromio stay
If any ship put out, then straight away.

80

IV,3,1151

There's not a man I meet but doth salute me
As if I were their well-acquainted friend;
And every one doth call me by my name.
Some tender money to me; some invite me;
Some other give me thanks for kindnesses;
Some offer me commodities to buy:
Even now a tailor call'd me in his shop
And show'd me silks that he had bought for me,
And therewithal took measure of my body.
Sure, these are but imaginary wiles
And Lapland sorcerers inhabit here.

81

IV,3,1165

What gold is this? what Adam dost thou mean?

82

IV,3,1171

I understand thee not.

83

IV,3,1179

What, thou meanest an officer?

84

IV,3,1184

Well, sir, there rest in your foolery. Is there any

85

IV,3,1190

The fellow is distract, and so am I;
And here we wander in illusions:
Some blessed power deliver us from hence!

86

IV,3,1197

Satan, avoid! I charge thee, tempt me not.

87

IV,3,1199

It is the devil.

88

IV,3,1211

Why, Dromio?

89

IV,3,1214

Avoid then, fiend! what tell'st thou me of supping?
Thou art, as you are all, a sorceress:
I conjure thee to leave me and be gone.

90

IV,3,1228

Avaunt, thou witch! Come, Dromio, let us go.

91

IV,4,1410

I see these witches are afraid of swords.

92

IV,4,1412

Come to the Centaur; fetch our stuff from thence:
I long that we were safe and sound aboard.

93

IV,4,1420

I will not stay to-night for all the town;
Therefore away, to get our stuff aboard.

94

V,1,1447

I think I had; I never did deny it.

95

V,1,1449

Who heard me to deny it or forswear it?

96

V,1,1453

Thou art a villain to impeach me thus:
I'll prove mine honour and mine honesty
Against thee presently, if thou darest stand.

97

V,1,1779

AEgeon art thou not? or else his ghost?

98

V,1,1805

No, sir, not I; I came from Syracuse.

99

V,1,1812

I, gentle mistress.

100

V,1,1815

And so do I; yet did she call me so:
And this fair gentlewoman, her sister here,
Did call me brother.
[To Luciana]
What I told you then,
I hope I shall have leisure to make good;
If this be not a dream I see and hear.

101

V,1,1823

I think it be, sir; I deny it not.

102

V,1,1829

This purse of ducats I received from you,
And Dromio, my man, did bring them me.
I see we still did meet each other's man,
And I was ta'en for him, and he for me,
And thereupon these errors are arose.

103

V,1,1858

He speaks to me. I am your master, Dromio:
Come, go with us; we'll look to that anon:
Embrace thy brother there; rejoice with him.

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