Speeches (Lines) for Antipholus of Ephesus
in "Comedy of Errors"

Total: 76

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,1,612

Good Signior Angelo, you must excuse us all;
My wife is shrewish when I keep not hours:
Say that I linger'd with you at your shop
To see the making of her carcanet,
And that to-morrow you will bring it home.
But here's a villain that would face me down
He met me on the mart, and that I beat him,
And charged him with a thousand marks in gold,
And that I did deny my wife and house.
Thou drunkard, thou, what didst thou mean by this?

2

III,1,626

I think thou art an ass.

3

III,1,631

You're sad, Signior Balthazar: pray God our cheer
May answer my good will and your good welcome here.

4

III,1,635

O, Signior Balthazar, either at flesh or fish,
A table full of welcome make scarce one dainty dish.

5

III,1,638

And welcome more common; for that's nothing but words.

6

III,1,640

Ay, to a niggardly host, and more sparing guest:
But though my cates be mean, take them in good part;
Better cheer may you have, but not with better heart.
But, soft! my door is lock'd. Go bid them let us in.

7

III,1,655

Who talks within there? ho, open the door!

8

III,1,658

Wherefore? for my dinner: I have not dined to-day.

9

III,1,661

What art thou that keepest me out from the house I owe?

10

III,1,680

Do you hear, you minion? you'll let us in, I hope?

11

III,1,684

Thou baggage, let me in.

12

III,1,688

You'll cry for this, minion, if I beat the door down.

13

III,1,694

Are you there, wife? you might have come before.

14

III,1,701

There is something in the wind, that we cannot get in.

15

III,1,705

Go fetch me something: I'll break ope the gate.

16

III,1,715

Well, I'll break in: go borrow me a crow.

17

III,1,719

Go get thee gone; fetch me an iron crow.

18

III,1,742

You have prevailed: I will depart in quiet,
And, in despite of mirth, mean to be merry.
I know a wench of excellent discourse,
Pretty and witty; wild, and yet, too, gentle:
There will we dine. This woman that I mean,
My wife—but, I protest, without desert—
Hath oftentimes upbraided me withal:
To her will we to dinner.
[To Angelo]
Get you home
And fetch the chain; by this I know 'tis made:
Bring it, I pray you, to the Porpentine;
For there's the house: that chain will I bestow—
Be it for nothing but to spite my wife—
Upon mine hostess there: good sir, make haste.
Since mine own doors refuse to entertain me,
I'll knock elsewhere, to see if they'll disdain me.

19

III,1,760

Do so. This jest shall cost me some expense.

20

IV,1,967

While I go to the goldsmith's house, go thou
And buy a rope's end: that will I bestow
Among my wife and her confederates,
For locking me out of my doors by day.
But, soft! I see the goldsmith. Get thee gone;
Buy thou a rope and bring it home to me.

21

IV,1,975

A man is well holp up that trusts to you:
I promised your presence and the chain;
But neither chain nor goldsmith came to me.
Belike you thought our love would last too long,
If it were chain'd together, and therefore came not.

22

IV,1,987

I am not furnish'd with the present money;
Besides, I have some business in the town.
Good signior, take the stranger to my house
And with you take the chain and bid my wife
Disburse the sum on the receipt thereof:
Perchance I will be there as soon as you.

23

IV,1,994

No; bear it with you, lest I come not time enough.

24

IV,1,996

An if I have not, sir, I hope you have;
Or else you may return without your money.

25

IV,1,1001

Good Lord! you use this dalliance to excuse
Your breach of promise to the Porpentine.
I should have chid you for not bringing it,
But, like a shrew, you first begin to brawl.

26

IV,1,1007

Why, give it to my wife and fetch your money.

27

IV,1,1010

Fie, now you run this humour out of breath,
where's the chain? I pray you, let me see it.

28

IV,1,1015

I answer you! what should I answer you?

29

IV,1,1017

I owe you none till I receive the chain.

30

IV,1,1019

You gave me none: you wrong me much to say so.

31

IV,1,1027

Consent to pay thee that I never had!
Arrest me, foolish fellow, if thou darest.

32

IV,1,1033

I do obey thee till I give thee bail.
But, sirrah, you shall buy this sport as dear
As all the metal in your shop will answer.

33

IV,1,1047

How now! a madman! Why, thou peevish sheep,
What ship of Epidamnum stays for me?

34

IV,1,1050

Thou drunken slave, I sent thee for a rope;
And told thee to what purpose and what end.

35

IV,1,1054

I will debate this matter at more leisure
And teach your ears to list me with more heed.
To Adriana, villain, hie thee straight:
Give her this key, and tell her, in the desk
That's cover'd o'er with Turkish tapestry,
There is a purse of ducats; let her send it:
Tell her I am arrested in the street
And that shall bail me; hie thee, slave, be gone!
On, officer, to prison till it come.
[Exeunt Second Merchant, Angelo, Officer, and]
Antipholus of Ephesus]

36

IV,4,1249

Fear me not, man; I will not break away:
I'll give thee, ere I leave thee, so much money,
To warrant thee, as I am 'rested for.
My wife is in a wayward mood to-day,
And will not lightly trust the messenger
That I should be attach'd in Ephesus,
I tell you, 'twill sound harshly in her ears.
[Enter DROMIO of Ephesus with a rope's-end]
Here comes my man; I think he brings the money.
How now, sir! have you that I sent you for?

37

IV,4,1260

But where's the money?

38

IV,4,1262

Five hundred ducats, villain, for a rope?

39

IV,4,1264

To what end did I bid thee hie thee home?

40

IV,4,1266

And to that end, sir, I will welcome you.

41

IV,4,1272

Thou whoreson, senseless villain!

42

IV,4,1275

Thou art sensible in nothing but blows, and so is an
ass.

43

IV,4,1288

Come, go along; my wife is coming yonder.

44

IV,4,1293

Wilt thou still talk?

45

IV,4,1303

There is my hand, and let it feel your ear.

46

IV,4,1309

Peace, doting wizard, peace! I am not mad.

47

IV,4,1311

You minion, you, are these your customers?
Did this companion with the saffron face
Revel and feast it at my house to-day,
Whilst upon me the guilty doors were shut
And I denied to enter in my house?

48

IV,4,1319

Dined at home! Thou villain, what sayest thou?

49

IV,4,1321

Were not my doors lock'd up and I shut out?

50

IV,4,1323

And did not she herself revile me there?

51

IV,4,1325

Did not her kitchen-maid rail, taunt, and scorn me?

52

IV,4,1327

And did not I in rage depart from thence?

53

IV,4,1333

Thou hast suborn'd the goldsmith to arrest me.

54

IV,4,1338

Went'st not thou to her for a purse of ducats?

55

IV,4,1346

Say, wherefore didst thou lock me forth to-day?
And why dost thou deny the bag of gold?

56

IV,4,1352

Dissembling harlot, thou art false in all;
And art confederate with a damned pack
To make a loathsome abject scorn of me:
But with these nails I'll pluck out these false eyes
That would behold in me this shameful sport.
[Enter three or four, and offer to bind him.]
He strives]

57

IV,4,1362

What, will you murder me? Thou gaoler, thou,
I am thy prisoner: wilt thou suffer them
To make a rescue?

58

IV,4,1379

O most unhappy strumpet!

59

IV,4,1381

Out on thee, villain! wherefore dost thou mad me?

60

V,1,1627

Justice, most gracious duke, O, grant me justice!
Even for the service that long since I did thee,
When I bestrid thee in the wars and took
Deep scars to save thy life; even for the blood
That then I lost for thee, now grant me justice.

61

V,1,1634

Justice, sweet prince, against that woman there!
She whom thou gavest to me to be my wife,
That hath abused and dishonour'd me
Even in the strength and height of injury!
Beyond imagination is the wrong
That she this day hath shameless thrown on me.

62

V,1,1641

This day, great duke, she shut the doors upon me,
While she with harlots feasted in my house.

63

V,1,1651

My liege, I am advised what I say,
Neither disturbed with the effect of wine,
Nor heady-rash, provoked with raging ire,
Albeit my wrongs might make one wiser mad.
This woman lock'd me out this day from dinner:
That goldsmith there, were he not pack'd with her,
Could witness it, for he was with me then;
Who parted with me to go fetch a chain,
Promising to bring it to the Porpentine,
Where Balthazar and I did dine together.
Our dinner done, and he not coming thither,
I went to seek him: in the street I met him
And in his company that gentleman.
There did this perjured goldsmith swear me down
That I this day of him received the chain,
Which, God he knows, I saw not: for the which
He did arrest me with an officer.
I did obey, and sent my peasant home
For certain ducats: he with none return'd
Then fairly I bespoke the officer
To go in person with me to my house.
By the way we met
My wife, her sister, and a rabble more
Of vile confederates. Along with them
They brought one Pinch, a hungry lean-faced villain,
A mere anatomy, a mountebank,
A threadbare juggler and a fortune-teller,
A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch,
A dead-looking man: this pernicious slave,
Forsooth, took on him as a conjurer,
And, gazing in mine eyes, feeling my pulse,
And with no face, as 'twere, outfacing me,
Cries out, I was possess'd. Then all together
They fell upon me, bound me, bore me thence
And in a dark and dankish vault at home
There left me and my man, both bound together;
Till, gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder,
I gain'd my freedom, and immediately
Ran hither to your grace; whom I beseech
To give me ample satisfaction
For these deep shames and great indignities.

64

V,1,1703

I never came within these abbey-walls,
Nor ever didst thou draw thy sword on me:
I never saw the chain, so help me Heaven!
And this is false you burden me withal.

65

V,1,1715

'Tis true, my liege; this ring I had of her.

66

V,1,1735

I never saw you in my life till now.

67

V,1,1740

Neither.

68

V,1,1758

I never saw my father in my life.

69

V,1,1762

The duke and all that know me in the city
Can witness with me that it is not so
I ne'er saw Syracusa in my life.

70

V,1,1807

I came from Corinth, my most gracious lord,—

71

V,1,1809

Brought to this town by that most famous warrior,
Duke Menaphon, your most renowned uncle.

72

V,1,1814

No; I say nay to that.

73

V,1,1824

And you, sir, for this chain arrested me.

74

V,1,1834

These ducats pawn I for my father here.

75

V,1,1837

There, take it; and much thanks for my good cheer.

76

V,1,1856

Dromio, what stuff of mine hast thou embark'd?

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