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A still-soliciting eye, and such a tongue
As I am glad I have not.

      — King Lear, Act I Scene 1

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1-20 of 102 total

KEYWORD: love

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# Result number

Work The work is either a play, poem, or sonnet. The sonnets are treated as single work with 154 parts.

Character Indicates who said the line. If it's a play or sonnet, the character name is "Poet."

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The numbering is not keyed to any copyrighted numbering system found in a volume of collected works (Arden, Oxford, etc.) The numbering starts at the beginning of the work, and does not restart for each scene.

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1

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Valentine

2

Cease to persuade, my loving Proteus:
Home-keeping youth have ever homely wits.
Were't not affection chains thy tender days
To the sweet glances of thy honour'd love,
I rather would entreat thy company
To see the wonders of the world abroad,
Than, living dully sluggardized at home,
Wear out thy youth with shapeless idleness.
But since thou lovest, love still and thrive therein,
Even as I would when I to love begin.

2

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Proteus

21

Upon some book I love I'll pray for thee.

3

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Valentine

22

That's on some shallow story of deep love:
How young Leander cross'd the Hellespont.

4

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Proteus

24

That's a deep story of a deeper love:
For he was more than over shoes in love.

5

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Valentine

26

'Tis true; for you are over boots in love,
And yet you never swum the Hellespont.

6

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Valentine

31

To be in love, where scorn is bought with groans;
Coy looks with heart-sore sighs; one fading moment's mirth
With twenty watchful, weary, tedious nights:
If haply won, perhaps a hapless gain;
If lost, why then a grievous labour won;
However, but a folly bought with wit,
Or else a wit by folly vanquished.

7

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Proteus

40

'Tis love you cavil at: I am not Love.

8

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Valentine

41

Love is your master, for he masters you:
And he that is so yoked by a fool,
Methinks, should not be chronicled for wise.

9

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Proteus

44

Yet writers say, as in the sweetest bud
The eating canker dwells, so eating love
Inhabits in the finest wits of all.

10

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Valentine

47

And writers say, as the most forward bud
Is eaten by the canker ere it blow,
Even so by love the young and tender wit
Is turn'd to folly, blasting in the bud,
Losing his verdure even in the prime
And all the fair effects of future hopes.
But wherefore waste I time to counsel thee,
That art a votary to fond desire?
Once more adieu! my father at the road
Expects my coming, there to see me shipp'd.

11

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Valentine

58

Sweet Proteus, no; now let us take our leave.
To Milan let me hear from thee by letters
Of thy success in love, and what news else
Betideth here in absence of thy friend;
And likewise will visit thee with mine.

12

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 1]

Proteus

66

He after honour hunts, I after love:
He leaves his friends to dignify them more,
I leave myself, my friends and all, for love.
Thou, Julia, thou hast metamorphosed me,
Made me neglect my studies, lose my time,
War with good counsel, set the world at nought;
Made wit with musing weak, heart sick with thought.

13

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 2]

Julia

151

But say, Lucetta, now we are alone,
Wouldst thou then counsel me to fall in love?

14

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 2]

Julia

154

Of all the fair resort of gentlemen
That every day with parle encounter me,
In thy opinion which is worthiest love?

15

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 2]

Julia

175

And wouldst thou have me cast my love on him?

16

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 2]

Lucetta

176

Ay, if you thought your love not cast away.

17

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 2]

Julia

179

His little speaking shows his love but small.

18

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 2]

Julia

181

They do not love that do not show their love.

19

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 2]

Lucetta

182

O, they love least that let men know their love.

20

Two Gentlemen of Verona
[I, 2]

Lucetta

198

To plead for love deserves more fee than hate.

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