Please wait

We are searching the Open Source Shakespeare database
for your request. Searches usually take 1-30 seconds.

progress graphic

Here I and sorrows sit;
Here is my throne, bid kings come bow to it.

      — King John, Act III Scene 1

Search results

1-20 of 33 total

KEYWORD: love

---

Double-click on any word to look it up in the concordance.
For an explanation of each column, hover your cursor over the column's title.

# Result number

Work The work is either a play, poem, or sonnet. The sonnets are treated as single work with 154 parts.

Character Indicates who said the line. If it's a play or sonnet, the character name is "Poet."

Line Shows where the line falls within the work.

The numbering is not keyed to any copyrighted numbering system found in a volume of collected works (Arden, Oxford, etc.) The numbering starts at the beginning of the work, and does not restart for each scene.

Text The line's full text, with keywords highlighted within it, unless highlighting has been disabled by the user.

1

Merry Wives of Windsor
[I, 1]

Sir Hugh Evans

17

The dozen white louses do become an old coat well;
it agrees well, passant; it is a familiar beast to
man, and signifies love.

2

Merry Wives of Windsor
[I, 1]

Robert Shallow

215

Cousin Abraham Slender, can you love her?

3

Merry Wives of Windsor
[I, 1]

Robert Shallow

224

Nay, conceive me, conceive me, sweet coz: what I do
is to pleasure you, coz. Can you love the maid?

4

Merry Wives of Windsor
[I, 1]

Slender

226

I will marry her, sir, at your request: but if there
be no great love in the beginning, yet heaven may
decrease it upon better acquaintance, when we are
married and have more occasion to know one another;
I hope, upon familiarity will grow more contempt:
but if you say, 'Marry her,' I will marry her; that
I am freely dissolved, and dissolutely.

5

Merry Wives of Windsor
[I, 1]

Slender

269

I love the sport well but I shall as soon quarrel at
it as any man in England. You are afraid, if you see
the bear loose, are you not?

6

Merry Wives of Windsor
[I, 3]

Falstaff

341

No quips now, Pistol! Indeed, I am in the waist two
yards about; but I am now about no waste; I am about
thrift. Briefly, I do mean to make love to Ford's
wife: I spy entertainment in her; she discourses,
she carves, she gives the leer of invitation: I
can construe the action of her familiar style; and
the hardest voice of her behavior, to be Englished
rightly, is, 'I am Sir John Falstaff's.'

7

Merry Wives of Windsor
[I, 3]

Nym

392

With both the humours, I:
I will discuss the humour of this love to Page.

8

Merry Wives of Windsor
[I, 4]

Hostess Quickly

502

[Aside to SIMPLE] Are you avised o' that? you
shall find it a great charge: and to be up early
and down late; but notwithstanding,—to tell you in
your ear; I would have no words of it,—my master
himself is in love with Mistress Anne Page: but
notwithstanding that, I know Anne's mind,—that's
neither here nor there.

9

Merry Wives of Windsor
[II, 1]

Mistress Page

568

What, have I scaped love-letters in the holiday-
time of my beauty, and am I now a subject for them?
Let me see.
[Reads]
'Ask me no reason why I love you; for though
Love use Reason for his physician, he admits him
not for his counsellor. You are not young, no more
am I; go to then, there's sympathy: you are merry,
so am I; ha, ha! then there's more sympathy: you
love sack, and so do I; would you desire better
sympathy? Let it suffice thee, Mistress Page,—at
the least, if the love of soldier can suffice,—
that I love thee. I will not say, pity me; 'tis
not a soldier-like phrase: but I say, love me. By me,
Thine own true knight,
By day or night,
Or any kind of light,
With all his might
For thee to fight, JOHN FALSTAFF'
What a Herod of Jewry is this! O wicked
world! One that is well-nigh worn to pieces with
age to show himself a young gallant! What an
unweighed behavior hath this Flemish drunkard
picked—with the devil's name!—out of my
conversation, that he dares in this manner assay me?
Why, he hath not been thrice in my company! What
should I say to him? I was then frugal of my
mirth: Heaven forgive me! Why, I'll exhibit a bill
in the parliament for the putting down of men. How
shall I be revenged on him? for revenged I will be,
as sure as his guts are made of puddings.

10

Merry Wives of Windsor
[II, 1]

Ford

677

Love my wife!

11

Merry Wives of Windsor
[II, 1]

Nym

689

[To PAGE] And this is true; I like not the humour
of lying. He hath wronged me in some humours: I
should have borne the humoured letter to her; but I
have a sword and it shall bite upon my necessity.
He loves your wife; there's the short and the long.
My name is Corporal Nym; I speak and I avouch; 'tis
true: my name is Nym and Falstaff loves your wife.
Adieu. I love not the humour of bread and cheese,
and there's the humour of it. Adieu.

12

Merry Wives of Windsor
[II, 2]

Falstaff

900

But, I pray thee, tell me this: has Ford's wife and
Page's wife acquainted each other how they love me?

13

Merry Wives of Windsor
[II, 2]

Ford

985

I have long loved her, and, I protest to you,
bestowed much on her; followed her with a doting
observance; engrossed opportunities to meet her;
fee'd every slight occasion that could but niggardly
give me sight of her; not only bought many presents
to give her, but have given largely to many to know
what she would have given; briefly, I have pursued
her as love hath pursued me; which hath been on the
wing of all occasions. But whatsoever I have
merited, either in my mind or, in my means, meed,
I am sure, I have received none; unless experience
be a jewel that I have purchased at an infinite
rate, and that hath taught me to say this:
'Love like a shadow flies when substance love pursues;
Pursuing that that flies, and flying what pursues.'

14

Merry Wives of Windsor
[II, 2]

Falstaff

1004

Of what quality was your love, then?

15

Merry Wives of Windsor
[II, 3]

Doctor Caius

1181

By gar, me dank you for dat: by gar, I love you;
and I shall procure-a you de good guest, de earl,
de knight, de lords, de gentlemen, my patients.

16

Merry Wives of Windsor
[III, 3]

Falstaff

1467

What made me love thee? let that persuade thee
there's something extraordinary in thee. Come, I
cannot cog and say thou art this and that, like a
many of these lisping hawthorn-buds, that come like
women in men's apparel, and smell like Bucklersbury
in simple time; I cannot: but I love thee; none
but thee; and thou deservest it.

17

Merry Wives of Windsor
[III, 3]

Mistress Ford

1474

Do not betray me, sir. I fear you love Mistress Page.

18

Merry Wives of Windsor
[III, 3]

Falstaff

1475

Thou mightst as well say I love to walk by the
Counter-gate, which is as hateful to me as the reek
of a lime-kiln.

19

Merry Wives of Windsor
[III, 3]

Mistress Ford

1478

Well, heaven knows how I love you; and you shall one
day find it.

20

Merry Wives of Windsor
[III, 3]

Falstaff

1530

I love thee. Help me away. Let me creep in here.
I'll never—

] Back to the concordance menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS