Please wait

We are searching the Open Source Shakespeare database
for your request. Searches usually take 1-30 seconds.

progress graphic

Poor and content is rich and rich enough.

      — Othello, Act III Scene 3

Search results

1-20 of 61 total

KEYWORD: love

---

Double-click on any word to look it up in the concordance.
For an explanation of each column, hover your cursor over the column's title.

# Result number

Work The work is either a play, poem, or sonnet. The sonnets are treated as single work with 154 parts.

Character Indicates who said the line. If it's a play or sonnet, the character name is "Poet."

Line Shows where the line falls within the work.

The numbering is not keyed to any copyrighted numbering system found in a volume of collected works (Arden, Oxford, etc.) The numbering starts at the beginning of the work, and does not restart for each scene.

Text The line's full text, with keywords highlighted within it, unless highlighting has been disabled by the user.

1

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 1]

Dumain

30

My loving lord, Dumain is mortified:
The grosser manner of these world's delights
He throws upon the gross world's baser slaves:
To love, to wealth, to pomp, I pine and die;
With all these living in philosophy.

2

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 1]

Ferdinand

167

Ay, that there is. Our court, you know, is haunted
With a refined traveller of Spain;
A man in all the world's new fashion planted,
That hath a mint of phrases in his brain;
One whom the music of his own vain tongue
Doth ravish like enchanting harmony;
A man of complements, whom right and wrong
Have chose as umpire of their mutiny:
This child of fancy, that Armado hight,
For interim to our studies shall relate
In high-born words the worth of many a knight
From tawny Spain lost in the world's debate.
How you delight, my lords, I know not, I;
But, I protest, I love to hear him lie
And I will use him for my minstrelsy.

3

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Don Adriano de Armado

338

I love not to be crossed.

4

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Moth

339

[Aside] He speaks the mere contrary; crosses love not him.

5

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Don Adriano de Armado

360

I will hereupon confess I am in love: and as it is
base for a soldier to love, so am I in love with a
base wench. If drawing my sword against the humour
of affection would deliver me from the reprobate
thought of it, I would take Desire prisoner, and
ransom him to any French courtier for a new-devised
courtesy. I think scorn to sigh: methinks I should
outswear Cupid. Comfort, me, boy: what great men
have been in love?

6

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Moth

373

Samson, master: he was a man of good carriage, great
carriage, for he carried the town-gates on his back
like a porter: and he was in love.

7

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Don Adriano de Armado

376

O well-knit Samson! strong-jointed Samson! I do
excel thee in my rapier as much as thou didst me in
carrying gates. I am in love too. Who was Samson's
love, my dear Moth?

8

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Don Adriano de Armado

387

Green indeed is the colour of lovers; but to have a
love of that colour, methinks Samson had small reason
for it. He surely affected her for her wit.

9

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Don Adriano de Armado

391

My love is most immaculate white and red.

10

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Don Adriano de Armado

413

I will have that subject newly writ o'er, that I may
example my digression by some mighty precedent.
Boy, I do love that country girl that I took in the
park with the rational hind Costard: she deserves well.

11

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Moth

417

[Aside] To be whipped; and yet a better love than
my master.

12

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Don Adriano de Armado

419

Sing, boy; my spirit grows heavy in love.

13

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Don Adriano de Armado

437

I love thee.

14

Love's Labour's Lost
[I, 2]

Don Adriano de Armado

463

I do affect the very ground, which is base, where
her shoe, which is baser, guided by her foot, which
is basest, doth tread. I shall be forsworn, which
is a great argument of falsehood, if I love. And
how can that be true love which is falsely
attempted? Love is a familiar; Love is a devil:
there is no evil angel but Love. Yet was Samson so
tempted, and he had an excellent strength; yet was
Solomon so seduced, and he had a very good wit.
Cupid's butt-shaft is too hard for Hercules' club;
and therefore too much odds for a Spaniard's rapier.
The first and second cause will not serve my turn;
the passado he respects not, the duello he regards
not: his disgrace is to be called boy; but his
glory is to subdue men. Adieu, valour! rust rapier!
be still, drum! for your manager is in love; yea,
he loveth. Assist me, some extemporal god of rhyme,
for I am sure I shall turn sonnet. Devise, wit;
write, pen; for I am for whole volumes in folio.

15

Love's Labour's Lost
[II, 1]

Katharine

542

The young Dumain, a well-accomplished youth,
Of all that virtue love for virtue loved:
Most power to do most harm, least knowing ill;
For he hath wit to make an ill shape good,
And shape to win grace though he had no wit.
I saw him at the Duke Alencon's once;
And much too little of that good I saw
Is my report to his great worthiness.

16

Love's Labour's Lost
[II, 1]

Princess of France

563

God bless my ladies! are they all in love,
That every one her own hath garnished
With such bedecking ornaments of praise?

17

Love's Labour's Lost
[III, 1]

Don Adriano de Armado

768

Sweet air! Go, tenderness of years; take this key,
give enlargement to the swain, bring him festinately
hither: I must employ him in a letter to my love.

18

Love's Labour's Lost
[III, 1]

Moth

771

Master, will you win your love with a French brawl?

19

Love's Labour's Lost
[III, 1]

Moth

773

No, my complete master: but to jig off a tune at
the tongue's end, canary to it with your feet, humour
it with turning up your eyelids, sigh a note and
sing a note, sometime through the throat, as if you
swallowed love with singing love, sometime through
the nose, as if you snuffed up love by smelling
love; with your hat penthouse-like o'er the shop of
your eyes; with your arms crossed on your thin-belly
doublet like a rabbit on a spit; or your hands in
your pocket like a man after the old painting; and
keep not too long in one tune, but a snip and away.
These are complements, these are humours; these
betray nice wenches, that would be betrayed without
these; and make them men of note—do you note
me?—that most are affected to these.

20

Love's Labour's Lost
[III, 1]

Don Adriano de Armado

792

Callest thou my love 'hobby-horse'?

] Back to the concordance menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS